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Fatty Lumpkins

This is a blog about a fat person doing things.
Jan 23 '13

Hi, I’m fat and I ride and show horses!

fatgirlsdoingthings:

I’m Emily. I’m a size 24/26/28 from Nebraska. Since I was six years old I’ve been riding horses.

It’s surprising to me how many people think I can’t ride well (or shouldn’t be riding at all). Seriously, people act very shocked that I’m such a talented rider. It’s like, “Listen people. I’ve been training to do this for 13 years. Of course I’m good”.

Horseback riding is surprisingly physical and demands support from the legs and abs, while being able to rise and fall using your calves to the beat of the trot, all while not moving your hands around. Anything faster than a walk requires each quadrant of your body to be moving independently. 

Here are photos of me and my partner, Red. He’s my 24 y/o Thoroughbred. 

Read More

Jan 22 '13

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Jan 22 '13
Jan 21 '13

fuckyeahtransfats:

damagedbeliefs:

Large chest binder problems.

Wearing darker colors can help conceal a large chest.

Jan 21 '13

Study finds fat acceptance blogs can improve health outcomes

re-cover-ed:

“Fat acceptance” blogs urging overweight people to shed negative feelings about their body image can lead to healthier diet and exercise choices, a study has found.

The fat acceptance movement, which seeks to foster a support network among overweight people, has inspired a plethora of blogs and web forums such as CorpulentFat Heffalump and The Rotund — an online community that’s become known as the “fatosphere”.

In a study published in the journal Qualitative Health Research, researchers from Monash University, the University of New England and the University of Canberra interviewed 44 fatosphere bloggers from Australia, the US and the UK about how their involvement in the movement had changed them.

“There’s been a lot of criticism of the movement that it promotes obesity and encourages people to give up on weight loss and makes their health worse,” said one of the researchers, Dr Samantha Thomas, a Senior Research Fellow at Monash University’s Department of Marketing.

“We saw there was a lot of opinion about the movement but very few people had actually studied it.”

Interviews with the respondents revealed many had experienced feelings of worthlessness, shame, crash diets, cycles of starvation and binge eating and laxative abuse before discovering the fatosphere.

“Having that support and feeling empowered, people slowly found that their health behaviours began to change dramatically. For example, many people suddenly felt confident to do swimming, something they would not have done before,” she said.

“People shifted their focus away from weight loss and more toward health. A lot of people started to take part in physical activity not as a way to lose weight but because they enjoyed it. Instead of pounding it out on the treadmill they start playing with their kids. It’s actually a massive shift in the way they looked at things.”

Shifting the focus away from restricting food and toward listening to the body’s needs could also lead to better food choices, said Dr Thomas.

“There are actually a lot of lessons for public health here,” she said.

“The term fat acceptance is really confronting for people. That’s why we have seen a lot of blame and criticism. Society tells us it’s not OK to be fat for a whole bunch of moral and medical reasons,” she said.

“This study shows that far from promoting obesity and promoting negative health behaviours, the movement is really positive for some people’s health.”

(Source: theconversation.edu.au)

Jan 20 '13
catifabulous:

fatsmartandpretty:

“I don’t care about your diet” print available on etsy 

I should buy this print and hang it on my office door.  Lunch time talk is reaching an all time fat shaming high recently.

catifabulous:

fatsmartandpretty:

“I don’t care about your diet” print available on etsy 

I should buy this print and hang it on my office door.  Lunch time talk is reaching an all time fat shaming high recently.

Jan 20 '13
"Fashion is often dismissed as at best, irrelevant, and at worst, downright counterproductive to the presumably more serious and high-minded business of political action. But is it possible to think of fashion as not only compatible with politics, but as a form of political engagement in its own right? This article offers one possible answer to this question through a case study of a virtual fashion community that represents bodies typically excluded from participation in mainstream fashion – namely, fat, queer, and femme identified bodies. This online community disrupts the politics of body size, gender, beauty, and consumerism that predominate fashion as both an economic and a cultural economy, creating a virtual “counterdiscourse” (Deleuze and Foucault 1977) in the process. Exploring how this counterdiscourse was constructed, contained, and challenged, this article demonstrates the very real potential of fashion as a site of political action and contestation even as it also reveals formidable limitations to this potential."

From my forthcoming article, ” Fashionable Resistance: Queer Fatshion Blogging as Counterdiscourse

(Posting because my convo with Marianne (http://therotund.tumblr.com/) just reminded me of it! BTW, I tried to make it as un-jargony and as nuanced an argument as possible, but it’s not totally successful, I do realize…)

(Source: catifabulous)

Jan 19 '13

therotund:

fairytalemood:

“Luscious” by Madalina Andronic

I love fat mermaids.

But I am kind of worried about how these two wound up in a field of flowers somewhere. 

Jan 19 '13
"My experience of being a fat black woman has not been a fat acceptance wonderland. I don’t feel like I have been shamed for my body, but I have felt pressure to have a more socially acceptable body size. I do worry about presenting myself well. Because of the history and attitudes in my community, I feel a responsibility to act in a manner that adheres to a strict code of conduct. Part of the code is hiding its existence from mainstream white culture. I struggle with those pressures when I don’t feel like pulling myself together, when I want to toss a scarf over my messy hair and grab some milk at the store, when I want to snarl at someone rather than do racism 101 for the umpteenth time. Being told by white women that I have it easy when it comes body image dismisses all of the complexities and difficulties of my identity and reduces them to “Cosmo says you’re fat. Well I ain’t down with that!” Making assumptions about someone’s identity and culture based on fragments of pop culture is dehumanizing. An important part of understanding the world beyond yourself, not just asking questions but also listening closely to people who have criticisms of your beliefs. Sometimes what you think is fact is based upon false premises. Black women do not live in a fat acceptance utopia and you’re making racist assumptions if you assume they do."
Jan 18 '13

therotund:

teamhotpants:

Retta is my favorite

AWESOME, there is a gifset.